Why Your Personal Statement Sucks

On the last couple episodes of the Thinking LSAT podcast [https://www.thinkinglsat.com/blog], Ben and I have read a half dozen personal statements. It’s that time of year. Over the next couple weeks, we’ll cover a few more. The purpose of this lesson is to give…

LSAT Logic Games: Worlds Are Easy

Like everything else on the LSAT, worlds are easier than you think. Sometimes students struggle for weeks or months before things finally click for them on LSAT logic games. Keep grinding! Students frequently improve from the low single digits on a section…

Negating “Assumption Negation”

This week, I’ve got “assumption negation” in my crosshairs. (That’s right: I’m about to negate the unnecessary “assumption negation” approach to Necessary Assumption questions—say that five times fast.) I used to teach Necessary Assumption questions…

It’s Not About “Tips”

Reaching a higher level of LSAT performance isn’t about tips and tricks. As I wrote last week, the only thing we do here at LSAT Demon is increase our students’ real understanding. If it ain’t about understanding the test, then we ain’t about it.…

LSAT the Easy Way

Last week, I announced in class that LSAT Demon is now a “contrapositive-free zone.” That’s because “contrapositive” is a five-syllable word that (1) appears only in LSAT classes—never on the actual test, (2) doesn’t really mean anything beyond…

Don’t Pay for Law School

Here at LSAT Demon, we believe firmly that you should go to law school for free or not at all. That’s because law school tuitions are wildly inflated, J.D. job outcomes are far from certain, salaries are bimodally distributed, and most law schools—including schools…

LSAT Logic Games Is a Test of Reading Comprehension

LSAT novices are frequently intimidated by Logic Games, perceiving them as “mathy” and therefore impenetrable for a future lawyer. In truth, the only math that appears on the LSAT—such as knowing what “more than” or “twice as many” means—is well…